Primary Currciulum

The curriculum in classes from Year 3 is a natural progression from that experienced in Kindergarten to Year 2. There is a greater focus on students: taking risks with their learning; gaining more independence and using many visible thinking strategies to enhance their higher order thinking skills.Core curriculum areasThe classroom teacher is responsible for

  • English
  • Mathematics
  • Science
  • Performing and Creative Arts (sensitive to Islamic principles)
  • Inquiry units which integrate the areas of geography, history, civics and citizenship, and economics and business

Specialist teachers

  • Qu’ran
  • Arabic language
  • Islamic Studies
  • Health and Physical Education (HPE)

Integration of learning areas is used where appropriate and Information Communication Technology (ICT) is integrated purposefully across the curriculum. Additionally, where appropriate and authentic, Islamic values and perspectives are embedded across our.

Learning and Well-being 
Upcoming Events 
  • Fri 18 Muharram 1440AH 28-9-2018ADTerm 3 Concludes
  • Fri 18 Muharram 1440AH 28-9-2018ADExhibition Open Day
  • Sat 19 Muharram 1440AH 29-9-2018ADTerm 3 Holidays
  • Mon 6 Safar 1440AH 15-10-2018ADTerm 4 Commences
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At Taqwa School, students progress from the learning to read from Iqra stage  to the advanced reading stage (Quran stage) where they are systematically taken through the guided reading of the Quran. This process is generally completed by the end of Junior School (Year 6). 

To keep parents well informed of their child’s progress in class, we have a Quran webpage in which the Quran teachers write up weekly updates. 

In Years 3 to 6, students are given a scheduled time after lunch to complete their wudhu in the purpose built wudhu centre and attend prayers in congregation in the Junior School building. There is an emphasis on creating an environment where students are able see salat as a natural extension of their connection with Allah (swt) and this is again further supported through the Islamic Studies classes where they learn the meaning of the words they recite during prayer.

The English curriculum is built around the three interrelated strands of Language, Literature and Literacy.

Years 3 and 4

In Years 3 and 4, students experience learning in familiar contexts and a range of contexts that relate to study in other areas of the curriculum. They interact with peers and teachers from other classes and schools in a range of face-to-face and online/virtual environments.

Students engage with a variety of texts for enjoyment. They listen to, read, view and interpret spoken, written and multimodal texts in which the primary purpose is aesthetic, as well as texts designed to inform and persuade. These encompass traditional oral texts including Aboriginal stories, picture books, various types of print and digital texts, simple chapter books, rhyming verse, poetry, non-fiction, film, multimodal texts, dramatic performances and texts used by students as models for constructing their own work.

The range of literary texts for Foundation to Year 10 comprises Australian literature, including the oral narrative traditions of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples, as well as the contemporary literature of these two cultural groups, and classic and contemporary world literature, including texts from and about Asia.

Literary texts that support and extend students in Years 3 and 4 as independent readers describe complex sequences of events that extend over several pages and involve unusual happenings within a framework of familiar experiences. Informative texts include content of increasing complexity and technicality about topics of interest and topics being studied in other areas of the curriculum. These texts use complex language features, including varied sentence structures, some unfamiliar vocabulary, a significant number of high-frequency sight words and words that need to be decoded phonically, and a variety of punctuation conventions, as well as illustrations and diagrams that support and extend the printed text.

Students create a range of imaginative, informative and persuasive types of texts including narratives, procedures, performances, reports, reviews, poetry and expositions.

Year 5 and 6

In Years 5 and 6, students communicate with peers and teachers from other classes and schools, community members, and individuals and groups, in a range of face-to-face and online/virtual environments.

Students engage with a variety of texts for enjoyment. They listen to, read, view, interpret and evaluate spoken, written and multimodal texts in which the primary purpose is aesthetic, as well as texts designed to inform and persuade. These include various types of media texts including newspapers, film and digital texts, junior and early adolescent novels, poetry, non-fiction and dramatic performances.

The range of literary texts for Foundation to Year 10 comprises Australian literature, including the oral narrative traditions of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples, as well as the contemporary literature of these two cultural groups, and classic and contemporary world literature, including texts from and about Asia.

Literary texts that support and extend students in Years 5 and 6 as independent readers describe complex sequences, a range of non-stereotypical characters and elaborated events including flashbacks and shifts in time. These texts explore themes of interpersonal relationships and ethical dilemmas within real-world and fantasy settings. Informative texts supply technical and content information about a wide range of topics of interest as well as topics being studied in other areas of the curriculum. Text structures include chapters, headings and subheadings, tables of contents, indexes and glossaries. Language features include complex sentences, unfamiliar technical vocabulary, figurative language, and information presented in various types of graphics.

Students create a range of imaginative, informative and persuasive types of texts including narratives, procedures, performances, reports, reviews, explanations and discussions.

The proficiency strands understanding, fluency, problem-solving and reasoning are an integral part of mathematics content across the three content strands: number and algebra, measurement and geometry, and statistics and probability. The proficiencies reinforce the significance of working mathematically within the content and describe how the content is explored or developed. They provide the language to build in the developmental aspects of the learning of mathematics. The achievement standards reflect the content and encompass the proficiencies.

Year 3 

At this year level:

  • understanding includes connecting number representations with number sequences, partitioning and combining numbers flexibly, representing unit fractions, using appropriate language to communicate times, and identifying environmental symmetry
  • fluency includes recalling multiplication facts, using familiar metric units to order and compare objects, identifying and describing outcomes of chance experiments, interpreting maps and communicating positions
  • problem-solving includes formulating and modelling authentic situations involving planning methods of data collection and representation, making models of three-dimensional objects and using number properties to continue number patterns
  • reasoning includes using generalising from number properties and results of calculations, comparing angles and creating and interpreting variations in the results of data collections and data displays.

Year 4

At this year level:

  • understanding includes making connections between representations of numbers, partitioning and combining numbers flexibly, extending place value to decimals, using appropriate language to communicate times and describing properties of symmetrical shapes
  • fluency includes recalling multiplication tables, communicating sequences of simple fractions, using instruments to measure accurately, creating patterns with shapes and their transformations and collecting and recording data
  • problem-solving includes formulating, modelling and recording authentic situations involving operations, comparing large numbers with each other, comparing time durations and using properties of numbers to continue patterns
  • reasoning includes using generalising from number properties and results of calculations, deriving strategies for unfamiliar multiplication and division tasks, comparing angles, communicating information using graphical displays and evaluating the appropriateness of different displays.

Year 5

At this year level:

  • understanding includes making connections between representations of numbers, using fractions to represent probabilities, comparing and ordering fractions and decimals and representing them in various ways, describing transformations and identifying line and rotational symmetry
  • fluency includes choosing appropriate units of measurement for calculation of perimeter and area, using estimation to check the reasonableness of answers to calculations and using instruments to measure angles
  • problem-solving includes formulating and solving authentic problems using whole numbers and measurements and creating financial plans
  • reasoning includes investigating strategies to perform calculations efficiently, continuing patterns involving fractions and decimals, interpreting results of chance experiments, posing appropriate questions for data investigations and interpreting data sets

Year 6 At this year level:

  • understanding includes describing properties of different sets of numbers, using fractions and decimals to describe probabilities, representing fractions and decimals in various ways and describing connections between them, and making reasonable estimations
  • fluency includes representing integers on a number line, calculating simple percentages, using brackets appropriately, converting between fractions and decimals, using operations with fractions, decimals and percentages, measuring using metric units and interpreting timetables
  • problem-solving includes formulating and solving authentic problems using fractions, decimals, percentages and measurements, interpreting secondary data displays and finding the size of unknown angles
  • reasoning includes explaining mental strategies for performing calculations, describing results for continuing number sequences, explaining the transformation of one shape into another and explaining why the actual results of chance experiments may differ from expected results.

 

Over Years 3 to 6, students develop their understanding of a range of systems operating at different time and geographic scales.

Year 3

In Year 3, students observe heat and its effects on solids and liquids and begin to develop an understanding of energy flows through simple systems. In observing day and night, they develop an appreciation of regular and predictable cycles. Students order their observations by grouping and classifying; in classifying things as living or non-living they begin to recognise that classifications are not always easy to define or apply. They begin to quantify their observations to enable comparison, and learn more sophisticated ways of identifying and representing relationships, including the use of tables and graphs to identify trends. They use their understanding of relationships between components of simple systems to make predictions.

Year 4

In Year 4, students broaden their understanding of classification and form and function through an exploration of the properties of natural and processed materials. They learn that forces include non-contact forces and begin to appreciate that some interactions result from phenomena that can’t be seen with the naked eye. They begin to appreciate that current systems, such as Earth’s surface, have characteristics that have resulted from past changes and that living things form part of systems. They understand that some systems change in predictable ways, such as through cycles. They apply their knowledge to make predictions based on interactions within systems, including those involving the actions of humans.

Year 5

In Year 5, students are introduced to cause and effect relationships through an exploration of adaptations of living things and how this links to form and function. They explore observable phenomena associated with light and begin to appreciate that phenomena have sets of characteristic behaviours. They broaden their classification of matter to include gases and begin to see how matter structures the world around them. Students consider Earth as a component within a solar system and use models for investigating systems at astronomical scales. Students begin to identify stable and dynamic aspects of systems, and learn how to look for patterns and relationships between components of systems. They develop explanations for the patterns they observe.

Year 6

In Year 6, students explore how changes can be classified in different ways. They learn about transfer and transformations of electricity, and continue to develop an understanding of energy flows through systems. They link their experiences of electric circuits as a system at one scale to generation of electricity from a variety of sources at another scale and begin to see links between these systems. They develop a view of Earth as a dynamic system, in which changes in one aspect of the system impact on other aspects; similarly, they see that the growth and survival of living things are dependent on matter and energy flows within a larger system. Students begin to see the role of variables in measuring changes and the value of accuracy in these measurements. They learn how to look for patterns and to use these to identify and explain relationships by drawing on evidence.

Year 3 and 4

Learners interact with family and the wider Arabic-speaking community, and at school they interact with their peers and the teacher in a variety of communicative activities. Specific language learning skills such as memory and communication strategies are developed. Learners primarily engage in a variety of listening and viewing activities, and understand familiar stories, songs and poems. They use Arabic in everyday interactions, such as giving and following instructions أرسم خطاً على الورقة؛ أكتب العنوان فوق, attracting attention and seeking help عندي فكرة رائعة!؛ ممكن أن أتكلم؟. They participate in collaborative activities such as sharing information about their routines, friendships and leisure activities. They listen to, view and read a range of print, digital and spoken texts, such as interactive stories and performances, and use their imagination to create simple texts such as dialogues, stories and cartoons. They locate and classify key points of information in spoken, written and multimodal texts, and convey information about their family, home and neighbourhood in simple texts such as diary entries, emails and short stories.

Year 5 and 6

Purposeful language use in authentic contexts and shared activities in the classroom develop language skills and enhance communication and understanding. Learning how Arabic is structured reinforces learners’ oracy and literacy. Learners develop their speaking skills by interacting with teachers, peers, family and local Arabic speakers to share their own and enquire about others’ experiences أقرأ قصة قبل النوم؛ وأنتِ هل تقرأين قبل النوم؟, social activities and opinions. They have access to a broader range of vocabulary, and use a growing range of strategies such as effective listening skills to support communication. They write more accurately and fluently for a range of purposes, contexts and audiences. They listen to, view and read Arabic folk tales, fables and films to engage with themes, characters and events, exploring embedded cultural beliefs, values and practices, and use their imagination to create and perform songs, poems, short plays and video clips. They obtain information from a range of sources about social, cultural and communicative aspects of lifestyles in Arabic-speaking communities, and present the information in different formats for particular audiences. Individual and group presentation and performance skills are developed through modelling, rehearsing and resourcing the content of presentations.

Year 3 and 4

The Year 3 and 4 curriculum further develops students’ knowledge, understanding and skills in relation to their health, wellbeing, safety and participation in physical activity. In these years, students begin to explore personal and social factors that support and contribute to their identities and emotional responses in varying situations. They also develop a further understanding of how their bodies grow and change as they get older.

The content explores knowledge, understanding and skills that supports students to build and maintain respectful relationships, make health-enhancing and safe decisions, and interpret health messages from different sources to take action to enhance their own health and wellbeing.

The curriculum in Years 3 and 4 builds on previous learning in movement to help students develop greater proficiency across the range of fundamental movement skills. Students combine movements to create more complicated movement patterns and sequences. Through participation in a variety of physical activities, students further develop their knowledge about movement and how the body moves. They do this as they explore the features of activities that meet their needs and interests and learn about the benefits of regular physical activity.

The Year 3 and 4 curriculum also gives students opportunities to develop through movement personal and social skills such as leadership, communication, collaboration, problem-solving, persistence and decision-making.

Focus areas to be addressed in Years 3 and 4 include:

  • alcohol and other drugs (AD)
  • food and nutrition (FN)
  • health benefits of physical activity (HBPA)
  • mental health and wellbeing (MH)
  • relationships and sexuality (RS)
  • safety (S)
  • active play and minor games (AP)
  • challenge and adventure activities (CA)
  • fundamental movement skills (FMS)
  • games and sports (GS)
  • lifelong physical activities (LLPA)
  • rhythmic and expressive movement activities (RE).

Year 5 and 6

The Year 5 and 6 curriculum supports students to develop knowledge, understanding and skills to create opportunities and take action to enhance their own and others’ health, wellbeing, safety and physical activity participation. Students develop skills to manage their emotions, understand the physical and social changes that are occurring for them and examine how the nature of their relationships changes over time.

The content provides opportunities for students to contribute to building a positive school environment that supports healthy, safe and active choices for everyone. Students also explore a range of factors and behaviours that can influence health, safety and wellbeing.

Students refine and further develop a wide range of fundamental movement skills in more complex movement patterns and situations. They also apply their understanding of movement strategies and concepts when composing and creating movement sequences and participating in games and sport. Students in Years 5 and 6 further develop their understanding about movement as they learn to monitor how their body responds to different types of physical activity. In addition, they continue to learn to apply rules fairly and behave ethically when participating in different physical activities. Students also learn to effectively communicate and problem-solve in teams or groups in movement settings.

Focus areas to be addressed in Years 5 and 6 include:

  • alcohol and other drugs (AD)
  • food and nutrition (FN)
  • health benefits of physical activity (HBPA)
  • mental health and wellbeing (MH)
  • relationships and sexuality (RS)
  • safety (S)
  • challenge and adventure activities (CA)
  • fundamental movement skills (FMS)
  • games and sports (GS)
  • lifelong physical activities (LLPA)
  • rhythmic and expressive movement activities (RE).

Years 3 and 4

In Years 3 and 4, learning in The Arts builds on the experience of the previous band. It involves students making and responding to artworks independently and collaboratively with their classmates and teachers.

As they experience The Arts, students draw on artworks from a range of cultures, times and locations. They explore the arts of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples and of the Asia region and learn that they are used for different purposes. While the arts in the local community should be the initial focus for learning, students are also aware of and interested in the arts from more distant locations and the curriculum provides opportunities to build on this curiosity.

As they make and respond to artworks, students explore meaning and interpretation, elements and forms, and social and cultural contexts of the arts. They make personal evaluations of their own and others’ artworks, making connections between their own artistic intentions and those of other artists.

Students continue to learn about safe practices in the arts and in their interactions with other artists. Their understanding of the role of the artist and the audience builds on their experience from the previous band. As an audience, students focus their attention on the artwork and respond to it. They consider why and how audiences respond to artworks.

In Years 3 and 4, students’ awareness of themselves and others as audiences is extended beyond the classroom to the broader school context.

In Visual Arts, students:

  • extend their awareness of visual conventions, and observe closely visual detail as they use materials, techniques and technologies and processes in visual arts forms
  • explore and experiment with visual conventions such as line, shape, colour and texture to develop an individual approach to a theme or subject matter
  • explore, observe and identify ideas and symbols used and adapted by artists in their artworks as they make and respond to visual arts
  • consider how and why artists, craftspeople and designers realise their ideas through different visual representations, practices, processes and viewpoints.

Years 5 and 6

In Years 5 and 6, students draw on artworks from a range of cultures, times and locations. They explore the arts of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples and of the Asia region and learn that they are used for different purposes. While the arts in the local community should be the initial focus for learning, students are also aware of and interested in the arts from more distant locations and the curriculum provides opportunities to build on this curiosity. 

As they make and respond to the arts, students explore meaning and interpretation, and social and cultural contexts of the arts. They evaluate the use of forms and elements in artworks they make and observe.

Students extend their understanding of safety in the arts. In Years 5 and 6, their understanding of the roles of artists and audiences builds on previous bands. They develop their understanding and use of performance or technical skills to communicate intention for different audiences. They identify a variety of audiences for different arts experiences as they engage with more diverse artworks as artists and audiences.

In Visual Arts, students:

  • develop understanding of use and application of visual conventions as they develop conceptual and representational skills
  • test and innovate with properties and qualities of available materials, techniques, technologies and processes, combining two or more visual arts forms to test the boundaries of representation.
  • explore a diversity of ideas, concepts and viewpoints as they make and respond to visual artworks as artists and audiences
  • draw ideas from other artists, artworks, symbol systems, and visual arts practices in other cultures, societies and times
  • extend their understanding of how and why artists, craftspeople and designers realise their ideas through different visual representations, practices, processes and viewpoints. 

Home learning takes place both within classroom and at home. Home Learning helps children prepare for lifelong learning. It provides an opportunity for students to share their learning with their families. 

Home learning should be:

  • purposeful;
  • an extension of child’s understanding of the world around them;
  • a means for developing good independent work habits and initiative;
  • a range of activities to meet the needs of all students.

The communication between parents and teachers is an important part of ensuring home learning is positive and beneficial for each child.

Teachers and parents should give encouragement and feedback to students who complete home learning.

Credit: Quran & Isl. St to Al Siraat College

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