Junior Primary Curriculum

In the junior years, K-2, there is a particular focus on the explicit teaching and learning of foundational literacy and numeracy skills. Our students are encouraged to be risk takers in their learning and engage in higher-order thinking.Class room teachers are responsible for the learning areas of:
  • English
  • Mathematic
  • Science
  • Performing and Creative Arts (sensitive to Islamic principles)
  • Inquiry units which integrate the areas of geography, history, civics and citizenship.

Specialist Teachers

  • Qu’ran
  • Arabic language
  • Islamic Studies
  • Health and Physical Education (HPE)

Integration of learning areas is used where appropriate and Information Communication Technology (ICT) is integrated purposefully across the curriculum. Additionally, where appropriate and authentic, Islamic values and perspectives are embedded across our curriculum.

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At Taqwa School, students progress from the learning to read from Iqra stage  to the advanced reading stage (Quran stage) where they are systematically taken through the guided reading of the Quran. This process is generally completed by the end of Junior School (Year 6). 

To keep parents well informed of their child’s progress in class, we have a Quran webpage in which the Quran teachers write up weekly updates. 

 

Kindergarten to Year 2

Students of Kindergarten to Year 2 learn the basics of salat and wudhu during their Islamic Studies classes. This includes memorisation of basic surahs and understanding the importance of prayer in the life of a Muslim. The goal is to instil the love for Allah (swt) so that worshipping Him becomes a pleasure and it is not seen as a burden.

The English curriculum is built around the three interrelated strands of Language, Literature and Literacy.

Kindergarten 

The English curriculum is built around the three interrelated strands of language, literature and literacy. Teaching and learning programs should balance and integrate all three strands. Together, the three strands focus on developing students’ knowledge, understanding and skills in listening, reading, viewing, speaking, writing and creating. Learning in English builds on concepts, skills and processes developed in earlier years, and teachers will develop and strengthen these as needed.

In the Foundation year, students communicate with peers, teachers, known adults and students from other classes.

Students engage with a variety of texts for enjoyment. They listen to, read and view spoken, written and multimodal texts in which the primary purpose is to entertain, as well as some texts designed to inform. These include traditional oral texts, picture books, various types of stories, rhyming verse, poetry, non-fiction, film, multimodal texts and dramatic performances. They participate in shared reading, viewing and storytelling using a range of literary texts, and recognise the entertaining nature of literature.

The range of literary texts for Foundation to Year 10 comprises Australian literature, including the oral narrative traditions of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples, as well as the contemporary literature of these two cultural groups, and classic and contemporary world literature, including texts from and about Asia. Literary texts that support and extend Foundation students as beginner readers include decodable and predictable texts that range from caption books to books with one or more sentences per page. These texts involve straightforward sequences of events and everyday happenings with recognisable, realistic or imaginary characters. Informative texts present a small amount of new content about familiar topics of interest; a small range of language features, including simple and compound sentences; mostly familiar vocabulary, known, high-frequency words and single-syllable words that can be decoded phonically, and illustrations that strongly support the printed text.

Students create a range of imaginative, informative and persuasive texts including pictorial representations, short statements, performances, recounts and poetry.

Year 1

In Year 1, students communicate with peers, teachers, known adults and students from other classes.

Students engage with a variety of texts for enjoyment. They listen to, read, view and interpret spoken, written and multimodal texts designed to entertain and inform. These encompass traditional oral texts including Aboriginal stories, picture books, various types of stories, rhyming verse, poetry, non-fiction, film, dramatic performances and texts used by students as models for constructing their own texts.

The range of literary texts for Foundation to Year 10 comprises Australian literature, including the oral narrative traditions of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples, as well as the contemporary literature of these two cultural groups, and classic and contemporary world literature, including texts from and about Asia. Literary texts that support and extend Year 1 students as independent readers involve straightforward sequences of events and everyday happenings with recognisably realistic or imaginary characters. Informative texts present a small amount of new content about familiar topics of interest and topics being studied in other areas of the curriculum. These include decodable and predictable texts which present a small range of language features, including simple and compound sentences, some unfamiliar vocabulary, a small number of high-frequency words and words that need to be decoded phonically, as well as illustrations and diagrams that support the printed text.

Students create a variety of imaginative, informative and persuasive texts including recounts, procedures, performances, literary retellings and poetry.

Year 2

In Year 2, students communicate with peers, teachers, students from other classes and community members.

Students engage with a variety of texts for enjoyment. They listen to, read, view and interpret spoken, written and multimodal texts in which the primary purpose is to entertain, as well as texts designed to inform and persuade. These encompass traditional oral texts, picture books, various types of print and digital stories, simple chapter books, rhyming verse, poetry, non-fiction, film, multimodal texts, dramatic performances and texts used by students as models for constructing their own work.

The range of literary texts for Foundation to Year 10 comprises Australian literature, including the oral narrative traditions of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples, as well as the contemporary literature of these two cultural groups, and classic and contemporary world literature, including texts from and about Asia.

Literary texts that support and extend Year 2 students as independent readers involve sequences of events that span several pages and present unusual happenings within a framework of familiar experiences. Informative texts present new content about topics of interest and topics being studied in other areas of the curriculum. These texts include language features such as varied sentence structures, some unfamiliar vocabulary, a significant number of high-frequency sight words and words that need to be decoded phonically, and a range of punctuation conventions, as well as illustrations and diagrams that support and extend the printed text.

Students create a range of imaginative, informative and persuasive texts including imaginative retellings, reports, performances, poetry and expositions.

 

The proficiency strands understanding, fluency, problem-solving and reasoning are an integral part of mathematics content across the three content strands: number and algebra, measurement and geometry, and statistics and probability. The proficiencies reinforce the significance of working mathematically within the content and describe how the content is explored or developed. They provide the language to build in the developmental aspects of the learning of mathematics. The achievement standards reflect the content and encompass the proficiencies.

Kindergarten

At this year level:

  • understanding includes connecting names, numerals and quantities
  • fluency includes readily counting numbers in sequences, continuing patterns and comparing the lengths of objects
  • problem-solving includes using materials to model authentic problems, sorting objects, using familiar counting sequences to solve unfamiliar problems and discussing the reasonableness of the answer
  • reasoning includes explaining comparisons of quantities, creating patterns and explaining processes for indirect comparison of length.

Year 1

At this year level:

  • understanding includes connecting names, numerals and quantities, and partitioning numbers in various ways
  • fluency includes readily counting number in sequences forwards and backwards, locating numbers on a line and naming the days of the week
  • problem-solving includes using materials to model authentic problems, giving and receiving directions to unfamiliar places, using familiar counting sequences to solve unfamiliar problems and discussing the reasonableness of the answer
  • reasoning includes explaining direct and indirect comparisons of length using uniform informal units, justifying representations of data and explaining patterns that have been created.

Year  2

At this year level:

  • understanding includes connecting number calculations with counting sequences, partitioning and combining numbers flexibly and identifying and describing the relationship between addition and subtraction and between multiplication and division
  • fluency includes readily counting numbers in sequences, using informal units iteratively to compare measurements, using the language of chance to describe outcomes of familiar chance events and describing and comparing time durations
  • problem-solving includes formulating problems from authentic situations, making models and using number sentences that represent problem situations, and matching transformations with their original shape
  • reasoning includes using known facts to derive strategies for unfamiliar calculations, comparing and contrasting related models of operations and creating and interpreting simple representations of data.

From Foundation to Year 2, students learn that observations can be organised to reveal patterns, and that these patterns can be used to make predictions about phenomena.

Kindergarten

In Kindergarten, students observe and describe the behaviours and properties of everyday objects, materials and living things. They explore change in the world around them, including changes that impact on them, such as the weather, and changes they can effect, such as making things move or change shape. They learn that seeking answers to questions they pose and making observations is a core part of science and use their senses to gather different types of information.

Year 1

 In Year 1, students infer simple cause-and-effect relationships from their observations and experiences, and begin to link events and phenomena with observable effects and to ask questions. They observe changes that can be large or small and happen quickly or slowly. They explore the properties of familiar objects and phenomena, identifying similarities and differences. Students begin to value counting as a means of comparing observations, and are introduced to ways of organising their observations.

Year 2

In Year 2, students describe the components of simple systems, such as stationary objects subjected to pushes or pulls, or combinations of materials, and show how objects and materials interact through direct manipulation. They observe patterns of growth and change in living things, and describe patterns and make predictions. They explore the use of resources from Earth and are introduced to the idea of the flow of matter when considering how water is used. They use counting and informal measurements to make and compare observations and begin to recognise that organising these observations in tables makes it easier to show patterns.

Arabic is learnt in parallel with English language and literacy. While the learning of Arabic differs from the learning of English, each supports and enriches the other. Arabic is used at home and in familiar Arabic-speaking settings, and in classroom interactions, routines and activities, supported by the use of materials and resources, gestures and body language. At this stage, there is a focus on play, imaginative activities, games, music, dance and familiar routines, which provide scaffolding for language development. Repetition and consolidation help learners to identify familiar and new words and simple phrases, and to recognise the purpose of simple texts. Learners use Arabic for functions such as greeting (مرحبا؛ صباح الخير), sharing information ( هذه أختي لينا؛ عمري ست سنوات ), responding to instructions ( نعم؛ أنا هنا؛ حاضر ), and taking turns in games and simple shared tasks. The transition from spoken to written language is scaffolded via shared exploration of simple texts and language features. Learners use a variety of cues, including images, context and frequently used word patterns, to comprehend texts and communicate.

Foundation Year

The Foundation Year curriculum provides the basis for developing knowledge, understanding and skills for students to lead healthy, safe and active lives. The content gives students opportunities to learn about their strengths and simple actions they can take to keep themselves and their classmates healthy and safe.

The content explores the people who are important to students and develops students’ capacity to initiate and maintain respectful relationships in different contexts, including at school, at home, in the classroom and when participating in physical activities.

The Foundation curriculum provides opportunities for students to learn through movement. The content enables students to develop and practise fundamental movement skills through active play and structured movement activities. This improves competence and confidence in their movement abilities. The content also provides opportunities for students to learn about movement as they participate in physical activity in a range of different settings.

Focus areas to be addressed in Foundation include:

  • safe use of medicines (AD)
  • food and nutrition (FN)
  • health benefits of physical activity (HBPA)
  • mental health and wellbeing (MH)
  • relationships (RS)
  • safety (S)
  • active play and minor games (AP)
  • fundamental movement skills (FMS)
  • rhythmic and expressive movement activities (RE).

Year 1 and 2

The curriculum for Years 1 and 2 builds on the learning from Foundation and supports students to make decisions to enhance their health, safety and participation in physical activity. The content enables students to explore their own sense of self and the factors that contribute to and influence their identities. Students learn about emotions, how to enhance their interactions with others, and the physical and social changes they go through as they grow older.

The content explores health messages and how they relate to health decisions and behaviours, and examines strategies students can use when they need help. The content also provides opportunities for students to learn through movement. It supports them in broadening the range and complexity of fundamental movement skills they are able to perform. They learn how to select, transfer and apply simple movement skills and sequences individually, in groups and in teams.

Students also further develop their knowledge, understanding and skills in relation to movement by exploring simple rule systems and safe use of equipment in a variety of physical activities and games. Through active participation, they investigate the body’s response to different types of physical activities. In addition, students develop personal and social skills such as cooperation, decision-making, problem-solving and persistence through movement settings.

Focus areas to be addressed in Years 1 and 2 include:

  • safe use of medicines (AD)
  • food and nutrition (FN)
  • health benefits of physical activity (HBPA)
  • mental health and wellbeing (MH)
  • relationships (RS)
  • safety (S)
  • active play and minor games (AP)
  • fundamental movement skills (FMS)
  • rhythmic and expressive movement activities (RE).

Foundation to Year 2

In Foundation to Year 2, learning in The Arts builds on the Early Years Learning Framework. Students are engaged through purposeful and creative play in structured activities, fostering a strong sense of wellbeing and developing their connection with and contribution to the world.

In the Foundation Year, students undertake The Arts appropriate for their level of development.

They explore the arts and learn how artworks can represent the world and that they can make artworks to represent their ideas about the world. They share their artworks with peers and experience being an audience to respond to others’ art making.

As they experience the arts, students draw on artworks from a range of cultures, times and locations. They explore the arts of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples and of the Asia region and learn that they are used for different purposes. While the arts in the local community should be the initial focus for learning, students are also aware of and interested in the arts from more distant locations and the curriculum provides opportunities to build on this curiosity.

As they make and respond to artworks, students explore meaning and interpretation, forms and processes, and social and cultural contexts of the arts. They make early evaluations of artworks expressing what they like and why.

Students learn about safe practices in the arts through making and responding safely in the different arts subjects.

They experience the role of artist and they respond to feedback in their art making. As an audience, they learn to focus their attention on artworks presented and to respond to artworks appropriately. In Foundation to Year 2, students learn to be an audience for different arts experiences within the classroom.

In Visual Arts, students:

  • become aware of visual conventions and learn to notice visual detail
  • explore how and why artworks are created and ways to use and apply visual conventions, such as line, shape, colour and texture
  • learn how their ideas or subject matter can be developed through different forms, styles, techniques, materials and technologies
  • learn about how and why artists, craftspeople and designers present their ideas through different visual representations, practices, processes and viewpoints.
 

Home learning takes place both within classroom and at home. Home Learning helps children prepare for lifelong learning. It provides an opportunity for students to share their learning with their families. 

Home learning should be:

  • purposeful;
  • an extension of child’s understanding of the world around them;
  • a means for developing good independent work habits and initiative;
  • a range of activities to meet the needs of all students.

The communication between parents and teachers is an important part of ensuring home learning is positive and beneficial for each child.

Teachers and parents should give encouragement and feedback to students who complete home learning.

Credit: Quran & Isl. St to Al Siraat College

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